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CONSERVATION GROUPS ASK FOR THE RELEASE OF MORE WOLF PACKS

July 14th, New Mexico: The release of Mexican gray wolves into the wild started in 1998 but has been mired in controversy and opposition from the Cattle Growers Association. Twenty-five conservation groups are now asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to release three more Mexican gray wolf packs into the Gila Wilderness to help with their race against extinction. 


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WOLVES AT THE DOOR IN NINTH CIRCUIT ARGUMENTS

July 12th, Oregon: In 2015, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission removed endangered species protections from gray wolves, a decision that was hotly contested by conservation groups in the state. The federal government should have done more to protect Oregon’s gray wolves, no matter what farmers and ranchers say, attorneys for five environmental groups told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday. 


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4 MEXICAN GRAY WOLVES CALL UTICA ZOO HOME

July 11th, New York: Four male Mexican gray wolves from California  have joined  the Utica Zoo's  lone female wolf, Sierra, a long-time resident of the zoo. The new males – all 2-year-old siblings – came from the California Wolf Center outside of San Diego.


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WDFW DELAYS RELAUNCH OF WOLF-DATA SHARING PROGRAM

July 10th, Washington: Eastern Washington is home to 19 of the state's 22 packs. The state began sharing wolf-tracking data with county officials and commercial livestock producers about five years ago.  In some cases, sensitive information was being shared and wolf dens were compromised.  When it comes to wolves, "the temperature is still very hot, especially in the northeast..."


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GOTHAM COYOTE PROJECT TRACKING COYOTES ACROSS NYC, STUDYING BEHAVIOR

July 9th, New York: In February, three coyotes were trapped in the Bronx and fitted with radio collars as part of a joint effort by the Gotham Coyote Project and the New York City Parks Department.  This new pilot project aims to find out just how coyotes are stealthily navigating the city that never sleeps.  


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WHOSE AFRAID OF THE BIG BAD WOLF SCIENTIST

July 5th, Washington: Not long ago, Rob Wielgus was a respected researcher at Washington State University  with his own prosperous lab and several graduate students under his guidance.  Then Wielgus, told wildlife managers, ranchers and politicians exactly how they had screwed up when it came to managing wolves.  His career is now over.


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NEW FEDERAL PLAN COULD MEAN THE END OF RED WOLVES IN NC

July 4th, North Carolina: A decade ago, up to 130 wild red wolves lived on the Albemarle peninsula in North Carolina.  Now it is estimated that only 35 remain.

Fish & Wildlife has proposed that the protective habitat for red wolves be shrunk, which would allow them to be shot if they wander onto private property.


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STATE HOSTS NATIONAL RED WOLF SPECIES SURVIVAL PLAN MEETING

July 3rd, Arkansas: Arkansas-State joins the ASU System, the Little Rock Zoo and the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka, Mo., to bring the Red Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) annual meeting to Little Rock July 23-25.   

The University is considering the development of an educational breeding facility.


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CHERNOBYL'S RADIOACTIVE 'WILDLIFE PRESERVE' SPAWNS GROWING WOLF POPULATION

July 1st, Ukraine: Gray wolves from the radioactive forbidden zone around the nuclear disaster site of Chernobyl  are prospering, not due to any mutant superpower, but because the radioactive zone now acts like a wildlife preserve. Their population density, within the zone, is estimated to be seven times greater than in surrounding reserves.