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LAWSUIT FILES TO STOP WASHINGTON STATE FROM KILLING WOLVES

August 9th, Washington: The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday it planned to kill more members of the Old Profanity Territory wolf pack. The agency killed one wolf last month in an effort to change the behavior of the pack. The Maryland-based Center for a Humane Economy filed the suit in King County Superior Court, contending too many wolves have been killed as a way to protect livestock at a single ranch in the Kettle River Range in Ferry County.


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WHAT THREATENED LIONS CAN TEACH US ABOUT THE CIRCLE OF LIFE

August 9th: The story of the collapse and reemergence of North America’s apex predator the gray wolf in Yellowstone National Park serves as both a cautionary tale and an optimistic reminder of what can happen when we keep our eye on carnivores’ broader connections to the world.


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EPA REAUTHORIZES USING "CYANIDE BOMBS" ON COYOTES AND WILD DOGS, ACTIVISTS COMPLAIN

August 9th: The Environmental Protection Agency is re-authorizing the use of M-44 chemical trap devices through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services department as well as in agencies across the west, according to the agency’s interim decision. Wildlife Services kills wild animals every year to protect livestock including cattle, sheep and goats.


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SEEING WOLVES AT DENALI? LET'S HOPE IT'S NOT TOO LATE

August 9th, Alaska: According to a survey last month of park bus drivers, there were only 15 sightings of 25 wolves over a 75-day period between April and July. An astonishing two thirds of the drivers reported seeing no wolves at all. This troubling trend could be the result of several factors, such as wolves killing other wolves, but it could also have resulted from allowing trophy hunting and trapping of wolves along the boundaries of the Park.


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KEENEY MEADOWS WOLVES CONFIRMED BY CAMERA

August 9th, Oregon: According to Ryan Platte, of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s John Day Field Office, trappers first reported seeing two black wolves in the Hog Creek and Long Creek Mountain area during the past winter. ODFW personnel found wolf tracks in the snow and set up trail cameras. There were no hits until June after the cameras were relocated.


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WOLF EXTRAVAGANZA AUG 17, SPEARFISH

August 8th, South Dakota: The Black Hills Regional Multiple Use Coalition (BHRMUC) will host a “Wolf Extravaganza” on Saturday August 17, 2019, from 3 to 5:30 pm, open to anyone interested in learning more about wolves and what it’s like to live with wolves as neighbors. This event is free of charge will take place at the High Plains Western Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD.


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CALIFORNIA'S LAST WILD WOLF PAGE SPOTTED WITH 3 NEW PUPS

August 8th, California: The pups were born in April to the Lassen Pack, a group of two to three adult wolves known to roam Lassen County in northeast California, about 100 miles south of the Oregon border, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) said in a quarterly report.


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MOVE THE LIVESTOCK AND QUIT SHOOTING WOLVES (EDITORIAL)

August 7th, Washington: It is easy to hold the state’s Fish and Wildlife Department in contempt for their actions, killing wolves for killing livestock. But why are livestock and wolves coming into contact in the first place? The root of the problem is the U.S. Forest Service’s grazing policy. It may come as a surprise to some that federal and state land management agencies issue permits and allow our public lands to be used by private industry for grazing livestock. For the fourth year in a row, in the same location in the Colville National Forest, for the same rancher, gray wolves are being killed for behaving as we should expect them to.


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WOLF POPULATION GROWS- ALONG WITH CONFLICTS WITH RANCHERS

August 6th, Arizona/New Mexico: A June status report detailed a whole series of conflicts between ranchers and the endangered Mexican gray wolves, reintroduced in 1998. Their population has fluctuated, but hasn’t grown much in the past five years — in part due to continued, mostly unsolved shootings.


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ACT NOW TO HELP PASS THREE CALIFORNIA WILDLIFE PROTECTION BILLS!

August 5th, California: On August 12th, the Senate Appropriations Committee will hear three bills that are crucial to protecting California’s wild animals from senseless cruelty and death:
AB 44, the bill to ban the state’s fur trade;
AB 1254, legislation to abolish trophy hunting of bobcats; and
AB 1788, which would prohibit the use of deadly second generation rodenticides (rat poison).

Thanks to your support, these bills have passed several hurdles. We need your voice once more to get them through this next committee.


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YELLOWSTONE ELK KNOW HOW TO AVOID WOLVES AND MOUNTAIN LIONS

August 4th: According to a just-released study; where prey live with more than one predator species, attention to one predator that ignores the role of another may lead to misunderstandings about the impact of predators on prey populations and ecosystems. The researchers were surprised to learn that mountain lions, not wolves, exerted the most pressure on elk habitat selection.


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RESEARCHERS HOPE CAMERAS WILL SHED CLUES ON COYOTE BEHAVIOR

August 3rd, Georgia: Researchers with the Atlanta Coyote Project are working with partners across the nation to study the effects of coyotes and urban wildlife in metro Atlanta, WABE Radio reported. Forty cameras -- from Zoo Atlanta to Milton, Georgia -- will be soon be in place.


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CAN TOURISM SAVE WOLVES IN GERMANY

August 3rd: The benefits of having an apex predator roam the forests in population-dense Germany are abstract when compared to the tangible livestock deaths they cause and the palpable fear they can evoke. And, as with so many controversial environmental topics, the economic argument tends to win out. But a third voice is now gaining traction in this debate, and that is tourism. Wolves present a new opportunity for nature tourists in Germany and a way to offset the financial hit to farmers.