news_november_1t.jpg

OREGON DOESN'T NEED COYOTE-KILLING CONTESTS

November 30th, Oregon: We have to ask, isn't there another way to raise money that doesn't require arbitrary wildlife killing? With all of the controversy surrounding canned hunts and safaris, shouldn't the message to the next generation of farmers and ranchers be one of avoiding indiscriminate killing?


news_november_1s.jpg

POSSIBLE TRACKS FOUND OF RARE WOLF THAT ESCAPED IN COLORADO

November 28th, Colorado: The year-old, captive-born male got out of the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center on Nov. 11. It had been taken there to breed with other wolves. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the wolf was spotted three days later, and tracks were found Friday that the wolf may have left.


news_november_1r.jpg

FAMOUS WOLF IS KILLED OUTSIDE YELLOWSTONE

November 28th, Yellowstone: Officials have confirmed that Yellowstone Wolf 926F of the Lamar Canyon Pack, known to some as “Spitfire”, was killed for trophy less than five miles from the northeast entrance to the park. She was the daughter of legendary Wolf 06.


news_november_1q.jpg

ARIZONA TOWN CONDEMNS COYOTE-KILLING CONTEST

November 27th, Arizona: "The senseless and wanton killing of wildlife has no place in a civilized society." When you go out and eliminate predators carte blanche it does very little to eliminate the predation," Project Coyote is helping introduce legislation to ban contests in several states.


news_november_1p.jpg

HUNTING FOR THE WOLF SOLUTION

November 24th, Colorado: The House of Representatives on Nov. 16 voted 196-180 to approve a bill that would require the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove the gray wolf from the list of endangered or threatened species in the Lower 48 states. That move came two days after the Center for Biological Diversity sued the Fish and Wildlife Service, saying it is violating the Endangered Species Act by failing to provide a comprehensive recovery plan for gray wolves in the Lower 48 states.


news_november_1m.jpg

ENDANGERED MEXICAN WOLF ESCAPES AT COLORADO WILDLIFE CENTER

November 24th, Colorado: An endangered Mexican, captive-born male wolf got out of an enclosure at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in the town of Divide, 55 miles (90 kilometers) south of Denver.

Trappers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Agriculture Department have set out multiple traps in hopes of recapturing it.


news_november_1l.jpg

THREE YOUNG MEXICAN GRAY WOLF SISTERS ARRIVE AT HERITAGE PARK ZOO

November 22nd, Arizona: The young Mexican gray wolves arrived at Heritage Park Zoo on Nov.14th. The 1½-year-old siblings are mostly full-grown, although they are expected to bulk up somewhat as they get older.


news_november_1k.jpg

NEW WILDLIFE BRIDGE TO PROTECT WOLVES IN EASTERN ANOTOLIA

November 22nd, Turkey: Wolves, which are part of a study conducted by the KuzeyDoğa Foundation, in Kar, Turkey, use part of a busy road as their transit route. Some wolves and wild animals are hit by vehicles while traversing this road and lose their lives.

As a result, representatives of the KuzeyDoğa Foundation and highway officials have decided to build a wildlife bridge on this road to prevent death or injury among wild animals, especially wolves. The bridge is on track to be completed next year.


news_november_1o.jpg

NEW STUDY ADDS TO CALLS FOR FORMAL RECOGNITION OF HIMALAYAN WOLF

November 21st: A new study by a team of British and Nepalese researchers has confirmed that the Himalayan wolf, a proposed taxonomic classification of a population of Tibetan wolves in the Himalayas and Tibet, is a genetically unique lineage or race of wolves, which must be conserved before it goes extinct.


news_november_1n.jpg

NATURE UP CLOSE: A WOLF PACK LOVE STORY

November 20th, Yellowstone: The main wolves in this story are: 755, a male wolf of unknown origin; '06, a legendary alpha female who could bring down a full-grown elk by herself (her name reflects the fact she was born in 2006, although she was later collared and became "832"); the White Lady (the longtime alpha female of the Canyon Pack, who was all white – a fairly rare color in Yellowstone wolves – and lived a long time, 12 years, until she was illegally shot just north of Yellowstone); and the Wapiti Alpha Female, the current alpha female of the Wapiti Lake Pack (she has never been collared).


news_november_1j.jpg

MINNESOTA READERS WRITE ABOUT: WOLF PROTECTION

November 20th, Minnesota: More than 80 percent of Minnesotans oppose the hunting and trapping of wolves there and believe that Congress exists to represent not only the people but the ecosystem that sustains them. "Any political effort to remove protections from the wolf will serve as a precedent for anti-science politicians to de-list many other species," according to writers.


news_november_1i.jpg

HOUSE VOTES TO REMOVE FEDERAL PROTECTIONS FOR GREY WOLVES

November 16th, Washington D.C.: On November 16, 2018, the House passed a bipartisan bill that would officially remove gray wolves from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife, overriding Fish and Wildlife’s rulemaking with a federal law. "In addition to stripping protections for most gray wolves from the federal endangered species list, this bill would preclude judicial review of de-listing actions, thus furthering a damaging trend of Congress undermining the ability of Americans to seek out justice and defend our civil rights, public health, and environment.”


news_november_1h.jpg

HOORAY - JUDGE SAVES SUPER ENDANGERED RED WOLVES' LIVES

November 10th, North Carolina: A federal judge has intervened to continue an injunction on the government’s allowance to kill and trap red wolves. Judge Terrence Boyle rightly chewed out the FWS for failing to live up to its own mission. “Wildlife are not the property of landowners but belong to the public and are managed by state and federal governments for the public good,” the judge wrote.


news_november_1g.jpg

MOUNT HOOD WOLVES APPEAR TO BE STICKING AROUND, NEW PICS SHOW

November 9th, Oregon: Though there have been rumors of wolves wandering the Cascades since at least 2013. However, the first definitive evidence came in January when the U.S. Forest Service caught the a pair of wolves on camera. In August, two wolf pups were observed on the southern flanks of Mount Hood, marking the first time a breeding pair of Wolves had been seen in the northern Cascades since the endangered canids first returned to the state.


news_november_1f.jpg

CAN WE LEARN TO LIVE WITH WOLVES AGAIN?

November 9th, Colorado: It has been decades since Colorado’s mountains have heard the full-throated howls of a wolf pack on a moonlit night, but that may be changing. Single wolves are returning to their former habitat and a breeding pair may meet in the next decade. Wolves are part of our Western wildlife heritage. Learning to live again with them in the Rocky Mountains may be one of our most important 21st-century lessons in ecology and humility.


news_november_1e.jpg

WASHINGTON WILDLIFE AGENCY ISSUES KILL ORDER FOR TWO MORE WOLF PACKS

November 7th, Washington: Since 2012 the state has killed 21 state-endangered wolves, 17 of whom were killed for the same livestock operator, a longtime, vocal opponent of wolf recovery. The ongoing kill operation to kill the OPT pack’s father wolf and only remaining pup, as well as the kill order issued today for members of the Smackout pack, are on behalf of the same individual.

In September the Department killed the father wolf of the Togo pack, leaving his mate to fend for their two pups on her own. In October the Department killed the breeding female of the Old Profanity Territory pack and a five-month-old pup from the pack, leaving the breeding male on his own to provide for the sole remaining pup.

Please call Donny Martorello, Wolf Policy Lead, Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife at (360) 902-2521 to voice your opposition to this killing.


news_november_1d.jpg

WDFW CONSIDERS KILLING TOGO PACK MEMBERS AFTER ATTACK ON CALF

November 5th, Washington: The Togo pack in the State of Washington has been blamed for six cattle depredations in the past six months. According to a news release, WDFW Director Kelly Susewind is considering the next steps, which could include lethal removal.


news_november_1c.jpg

ALPINE WOLF POPULATION GROWING EXPONENTIALLY

November 3rd, Switzerland: Wolves were nearly extinct in Europe before the first ones began reappearing in the Alps and in Switzerland in the mid-1990's. The Swiss Wolf Group’s latest study indicates that 98 wolf packs were active in Alpine regions between 2017 and April of this year.


news_november_1b.jpg

PUBLIC OVERWHELMINGLY OPPOSES PLAN TO CURTAIL RED WOLF RECOVERY IN NORTH CAROLINA

November 1st, Washington: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed reducing the recovery area where red wolves can safely roam by more than 90 percent. The revised recovery area would only be expected to provide sufficient space for 10 to 15 red wolves.

Out of 108,124 comments submitted to the Fish and Wildlife Service on the proposal, 107,988 comments — or 99.9 percent — spoke out in favor of the red wolves and their need for strong federal protections.


news_november_1a.jpg

NINE MEXICAN WOLVES LEAVING BROOKFIELD ZOO FOR NEW HOMES

November 1st, Illinois: The zoo’s current alpha pair, Zana and Flint, will move to a facility in Eureka, Missouri, along with a young female named Springer. Six male wolves – Rio, Azul, Mateo, Jeff, David and Temp – will head to a zoo in Springfield, Missouri. Two-year-old Ela will remain at Brookfield Zoo and become the new alpha female, with a new alpha male scheduled to arrive before the end of the year. The move is part of a survival plan to help sustain the endangered species, the zoo announced this week.